Where is There Injustice?

By Ken Wytsma

This summer the justice and missions interns that were part of the Antioch Internship program read and discussed Pursuing Justice along with several other projects they did for the church and the community. Below is a lament written by Kimber Walbek that was a response to what she learned this summer, partly influenced by her reading. Thanks for sharing, Kimber!

I thought I saw it in a picket fence,
In a rally or a strike,
“We defend the unborn babies!”
A woman shouts into her mic.

I thought I saw it in her eyes,
That girl who is locked away,
Sold to the system at 3 years old,
And raped ten times a day.

I thought it was with that older man,
Who sits with his dog lone,
“Will work for food,” his sign reads,
While people pass by on their phone.

I thought it was in the climate,
Tainted from global warming,
All the chemicals sprayed on crops,
And our ignorance slowly forming.

I thought injustice was on the outside,
Ruining the world surrounding,
But then I looked deep within me,
And saw all the injustice abounding.

I confess to hate murder,
Yet my words are filled with hate.
I easily oppose sex slavery,
Yet the lust in my heart is great.

I am a proponent of freely giving,
Yet I hold my wallet tightly,
I say I care about the world,
Yet take my overconsumption lightly. 

Jesus–please forgive me,
Injustice didn’t start out there,
But the world has hate and evil,
Because I truly do not care.

Where there is hate in the world, bring love
Cause lust and destruction to flee,
Bring healing to the broken, a path to the lost
But make the justice start within me. 

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Categories: Justice & Culture

Ken Wytsma is a teacher, entrepreneur and author. He is the founder of The Justice Conference and president of Kilns College, as well as the author of Pursuing Justice: The Call to Live and Die for Bigger Things, The Grand Paradox: The Messiness of Life, the Mystery of God and the Necessity of Faith, and Create vs. Copy:Embrace Change. Ignite Creativity. Break Through with Imagination.

Theology and Culture